j. colin hill

jch2200 at columbia dot edu

colin

affiliations:

assistant professor, department of physics, columbia university
associate research scientist, flatiron institute center for computational astrophysics (part of the simons foundation)

research interests:

My research is in physical cosmology. I analyze cosmological data to search for evidence of new physics and to understand processes involved in structure formation. Much of my work focuses on the cosmic microwave background radiation. I am a member of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, Simons Observatory, and CMB-S4 collaborations.

CV
papers

group members:

Boris Bolliet (postdoc)
Aleksandra (Ola) Kusiak (Ph.D. student)
Kristen Surrao (Ph.D. student)
Alina Sabyr (Ph.D. student)

research highlights and data products:

MCMC chains from early dark energy analyses and Modified CLASS Einstein-Boltzmann code for EDE calculations (see Hill, McDonough, Toomey, & Alexander (2020))
Compton-y maps from ACT (2014-15) + Planck (PR3) data on LAMBDA (see Madhavacheril, Hill, Naess, et al. (2020))
Multi-tracer CMB delensing maps from Planck and WISE data (see Yu, Hill, & Sherwin (2017))
Fisher code for CMB spectral distortion forecasting (see Abitbol, Chluba, Hill, & Johnson (2017))
Compton-y map from Planck HFI data (see Hill & Spergel (2014))
tSZ power spectrum Fisher matrices (see Hill & Pajer (2013))
mangle software (see Swanson, Tegmark, Hamilton, & Hill (2008))

in the media:

(c.f. Hill et al. (2021)):
Nature
How Stuff Works

(c.f. Hill, Ferraro, et al. (2016) and Ferraro, Hill, et al. (2016)):
Discover

(c.f. Flauger, Hill, and Spergel (2014)):
NY Times
Washington Post
The Guardian
Nature
Quanta
Daily Californian

elsewhere:

Aspen Center for Physics Colloquium (September 2021)
Public Talk at Aspen Center for Physics on the Hubble Conundrum (August 2020)
YouTube Cosmology Talk on Early Dark Energy and Cosmological Concordance (May 2020)
``Dust, Distortions, and Shadows in the Universe's Oldest Light'', cover article for Spring 2015 issue of Sigma Pi Sigma Radiations
interview on ``These Vibes Are Too Cosmic'', WPRB 103.3 FM, Princeton
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